UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex

2007 | Davis, CA

  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex Exterior Photo: Tim Griffith
  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex View into Break Area Photo: Tim Griffith
  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex Exterior View of Grain Silo Conference Room Photo: Tim Griffith
  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex Grain Silo Conference Room Photo: Tim Griffith
  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex Mail Sorting Facility Photo: Tim Griffith
  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex Loading Docks Photo: Tim Griffith
  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex Corridor Photo: Tim Griffith
  • UC Davis Hopkins Services Complex Exterior Photo: Tim Griffith

“The project successfully created a highly functional, efficient and artful work space with an innovative and cost effective, environmentally sensitive and site appropriate design – a very rare combination indeed!”

– Charles McGinn, Associate Architect/Project Manager, UC Davis Facilities Management

The Hopkins Services Complex is the first phase of the future headquarters of the Operations and Maintenance group, which oversees the University’s physical plan and infrastructure. The program includes administrative offices, construction trade shop space, material receiving and processing, warehouse and storage space as well as covered and uncovered yard area, parking, and landscaping. The project also includes infrastructure improvements for all utilities and access roads, domestic water, wastewater service, natural gas, electrical, communication and data, utility water, access roads and parking. The site is in a low lying area away from the main campus near a wastewater treatment plant. A key goal was to create a highly pragmatic, functional complex that simultaneously upholds the University’s image.

The Complex is located in an area of campus that consists of buildings that derive their form from traditional agricultural vernacular, with pitched roofs and galvanized steel siding and roofing. The custom-designed, pre-engineered steel frame building was selected by the University and design team to meet strict budget limitations, as well as to complement its function and its setting within the agrarian Central Valley. The structure is 32 feet at its highest point, and 20 feet at its lowest; the design team created smaller structures within the building—“buildings within buildings”—that provide a more human scale, and house offices, conferencing, and break areas. A tribute to the University’s agricultural setting, the design team transformed an authentic grain silo into a unique conference room.